Top 10 Tips for taking kids to festivals

Taking kids to festivals can seem like a daunting task, but can actually be hugely satisfying. Our festival savvy Muddy family, the Grima’s, are here to reassure us that it can be one of the best experiences you ever have.

The brave pair are heading with their Muddy Pups Luca and Jasper to none other then…GLASTONBURY! Yes, Glastonbury. Yet this fun-loving family is well seasoned in this department, and will be sharing their full Glastonbury experience with us. Until then, David and Claire have given us their Top 10 tips for taking children to festivals. Read on and be inspired!


 

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1) Involve the little ones in the build up; show them photos on Facebook of the festival site being built and the cows grazing in the fields before the pyramid stage is erected.  It helps them to appreciate the magnitude of the festival and the work that goes into it. Get them familiar with some of the music they’re likely to hear.

2)  Possibly the most important rule of all, pack those waterproofs! As a certain friend of ours said some years ago, wearing flip flops to a festival is definitely a terrible idea. Even with the promise of ever-lasting sunshine over the festival weekend, wellies and children’s lightweight waterproofs are an absolute necessity as the ground will most likely turn to some form of mud, because it will most likely rain for some part of well, every day. We highly recommend packing a Muddy Puddles Pac-a-Mac. Convenient and packable (into a built in pocket of the jacket), you can easily carry this mac by hanging it onto your backpack by its own carabiner.

Kids wellies are also essential, and over the past 3 years of bringing Jasper and Luca to festivals we have always bought from the Muddy Puddles range and they have lasted the entire festival and beyond. As well as durability, they really do have the best selection of beautiful and bright patterns to choose from. See the full range here. We personally love the yellow raindrops and the stripes in blue and white.

3) Find out where the family camping is and if you need to pre-book it.  At Glastonbury you just turn up.  We’d recommend the family camping to the west of the festival so it’s worth parking on that side of the site.  At Isle of Wight you had to book.  We hadn’t but we turned up and they let us in anyway when we asked nicely.  People are generally really cool to kids and parents at festivals.

L1001227 copy4) Find a small trailer or something that you can use to help transport all your stuff from the car to where you are camping.  You can then pimp this up and make it a really comfy, cosy little den for the kids to rest or sleep in when they need to.  It is also much easier for transporting them when they have outgrown the buggy yet are still too little to want to trek for anything over 20 mins.

5) Find out what’s going on (and when) in the kids field and what it is that you don’t want to miss yourselves.  Have a vague plan of action so you don’t miss your must-see stuff, but also be prepared to go with the flow.  Kids specific entertainment at Glastonbury is brilliant and it is worth queuing for the helter-skelter; it’d loads of fun and the view from the top is great.  And it’s all free.

L1001147 copy 26) Take loads of bread sticks, oat cakes, yo-yo bears or whatever other popular snacks you have at home.  Any attempt at a balanced diet will probably go missing for a few days.  For all of you. That said, the choice of food at Glastonbury is fantastic.  You can often request child’s portions when not overtly advertised and pay a bit less.

7) Dry cereal can work well for breakfast if you are up early and have no fresh milk (Cheerios, shreddies etc).

8) Since you are likely to be up when the sun rises, take a walk and watch the party goers come back from their night out when you’ve already had 7 hrs sleep, and reminisce about when that used to be you.

L1001283 copy9) Eat lots of ice cream. It’s summer and it makes everyone happy.

10) Go dancing together.  Find somewhere away from the main stages that’s playing fun music and have a family dance.  This might well involve lots of spinning little people around and getting very dizzy.

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